Uniteasy is more than unit conversion

dyne

The unit of force (symbol dyn) in CGS system, a special name for 1 g.cm/s². It is the force required to give a mass of 1 gram an acceleration of 1 cm/s². 1 dyne equals 10-5 newtons. The word dyne comes from the Greek dynamis, power while it's a unit of force not power.

gram-force

A unit of force in CGS system (symbol gf). A gram-force is the gravitational force on a mass of one gram based on the standard acceleration of freefall 9.80665 m/s². 1 gram-force equals 0.00980665 newton.

kilogram-force

The unit of force (symbol kgf) or kilopond (kp) is defined as the force exerted by earth's gravity on a body of one kilogram of mass. The earth'gravity here is based on the standard acceleration of freefall 9.80665 m/s² exactly as defined in the 3rd CGPM in 1901. It is the force equals 9.80665 newton exactly. This unit must be distinguished from the local weight of a body with 1 kilogram of mass. The force of gravity varies slightly on the earth. It is stronger at the poles than at the equator because the poles are closer to the earth's centre. The gravity of the moon is about 1/6 of that on earth, so the weight of 180 kgf on earth is only 30 kgf on the moon.

kilopond

A unit of force (symbol kipf)used in the United States primarily by architects and engineers to measure engineering loads, which equals 1,000 pounds-force and is equivalent to one half of a U.S. ton. Although uncommon, it is occasionally also considered a unit of mass, equal to 1,000 pounds. The name comes from combining the words "kilo" and "pound" and is occasionally called a kilopound.

kip

A unit of force (symbol kipf)used in the United States primarily by architects and engineers to measure engineering loads, which equals 1,000 pounds-force and is equivalent to one half of a U.S. ton. Although uncommon, it is occasionally also considered a unit of mass, equal to 1,000 pounds. The name comes from combining the words "kilo" and "pound" and is occasionally called a kilopound.

newton

The SI unit of force (symbol N), a special name for SI derived unit kg.m/s² according to Newton's second law. It is the force required to give a mass of 1 kilogram an acceleration of 1 m/s². The unit is named for British physicist, mathematician and philosopher Isaac Newton (1642-1727), for his great discovery about the laws of motion.

ounce-force

A unit of force in foot-pound-second system. A ounce-force is the gravitational force on a mass of one ounce based on the standard acceleration of freefall 9.80665 m/s². 1 ounce-force equals 0.278013850953781 newton.

pond

A unit of force in metric system, formerly more common and still used for some purposes. A pond is the gravitational force on a mass of one gram. The gravity here is based on the standard acceleration of freefall 9.80665 m/s² exactly as defined in the 3rd CGPM in 1901. 1 pond equals 0.00980665 newton.

pound-force

A unit of force in foot-pound-second system. A pond is the gravitational force on a mass of one pound based on the standard acceleration of freefall 9.80665 m/s². 1 pound-force equals 4.4482216152605 newton.

poundal

A non-SI unit of force based on the foot-pound-second system (symbol pdl), a special name for lb·ft/s². It is defined as the force necessary to accelerate a pound of mass at 1 foot per second, per second. 1 pdl = 0.138 254 954 376 N exactly.

sthène

A unit of force in the metre-tonne-second system (symbol sn). It is the force required to give a mass of 1 metric ton (1000 kilograms) an acceleration of 1 m/s². 1 sthène = 1000 newtons .

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