Uniteasy is more than unit conversion

coulomb

The unit of quantity of electricity or electric charge (symbol C), is the quantity of electricity carried in 1 second by a current of 1 ampere.

ampere second

The unit of charge expressed in other SI unit (symbol A·s) is the quantity of electricity carried in 1 second by a current of 1 ampere.

ampere hour

The quantity of electricity or electric charge carried in 1 hour by a current of 1 ampere. It equals 3600 coulombs.

elementary charge

Electric charge one elctron or proton carries. Electron carries negative charge, proton carries postive charge. It is about 1.602177 x 10-19 coulomb.

abcoulomb

The electric charge unit in the CGS system of electromagnetic unit (symbol abC). It is the quantity of electricity carried in 1 second by a current of 1 abampere. One abcoulomb is equal to 10 coulombs.

EMU of charge

The electric charge unit in the CGS system of electromagnetic unit, abcoulomb (symbol abC).

ESU of charge

Unit of charge in the CGS system of electrostatic unit, statcoulomb (symbol statC). It is defined as the charge which exerts a force of 1 dyne on a charge of equal magnitude at a distance of 1 cm.

faraday

The unit of charge used in the electrolysis process of electrochemical. It is the charge of Avogadro's number of electrons, which is about 96485.3415 coulombs of electric charge. The unit is named after British electrochemist and physicist Michael Faraday.

franklin 

A CGS unit of electric charge (symbol Fr) equals 1 statcoulomb or 3.3356 x 10-10 coulomb. It is the electric charge which exerts a force of one dyne on an equal charge at a distance of one centimeter. The unit honors Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), one of the leaders of the American Revolution, who was also an early investigator of electricity.

statcoulomb

The electrostatic unit of quantity of electricity or electric charge (symbol statC), represents the quantity of charge transferred in one second by a constant current of one statampere. It is equivalent to 1/c (c is the speed of light) or approximately 3.3356 × 10-10 coulomb.

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